Morlacco Julep

By Francesco Lafranconi

More Than Maraschino has been nominated for a Taste Award!

In the area around Padua, Italy, where Luxardo produces its liqueurs and confectionary products, over 22,000 cherry trees line the hillsides. It is from these trees that the famous Luxardo Maraschino Cherries are harvested and the Luxardo Cherry "Sangue Morlacco" Liqueur is made.

As in all products of quality, there is a deep history behind Luxardo Liqueurs. In the case of the Cherry Morlacco Liqueur, the product takes its name from the color of the blood spilled by the famed Morlacco Troops who fought against the Turkish invasion in the late 1700's.

Not only do Luxardo Maraschino Cherries enhance any cocktail, along with their cousin, the Luxardo Cherry "Sangue Morlacco" Liqueur, they provide you with a great story to tell.

Watch More Episodes of Luxardo's More Than Maraschino video series:

Episode 1 - Peruvian Wish Cocktail

Episode 2 - Windtalker Cocktail

Episode 3 - Sorrentino Cocktail

Episode 4 - Morlacco Julep

Episode 5 - Lady Whisper Cocktail

Episode 6 - Last Wish Cocktail



Learn more about the Luxardo family and their products: anchordistilling.com/brands/luxardo



Like Luxardo on Facebook: facebook.com/LuxardoUSA

Recipe

Ingredients

1 1/4 oz - 37.5 ml Lepanto Spanish Brandy

3/4 oz - 22.5 ml Luxardo Cherry "Sangue Morlacco" Liqueur

4 Sprigs Mint

Float or Mist of Luxardo Amaretto di Saschira

Instructions

Place the mint in a tumbler glass or julep cup and muddle briskly to release the oils.

Add Luxardo Cherry Liqueur and Spanish Brandy.

Fill glass or cup with crushed ice.

Stir well and serve with a float of Luxardo Amaretto.

Garnish with Luxardo Maraschino Cherries and a sprig of mint.

Comments
steve7500 7 Nov 2012
1:54 pm

Francesco,I have enjoyed your videos but this was the best. Let me ask you,are the Luxardo Cherries tart or bitter on purpose ? If so,these same cherries would not work in an Old Fashion Cocktail which would cause them to be Muddled , am I correct ?
Do you sell your products in Michigan ? I would like to try some of them. Thanks for the info and the history lesson.
What5 is the brand of Spanish Brandy you were using ?

Small Screen Colin 7 Nov 2012
2:04 pm

steve7500,

I know that Francesco is traveling right now, so I will try to answer your question.
The cherries right off the tree are a variety of sour cherry. They are then taken through a process that sweetens them and then they are packed in a delicious cherry syrup. You can find out more here: http://www.anchordistilling.com/spirits/luxardo-maraschino-cherries
You should be able to find Luxardo Maraschino Cherries in any gourmet food shop or stores like While Foods. Other Luxardo products can be found across the country depending on the state.
The brandy Fracncesco uses is Lepanto: http://www.anchordistilling.com/brands/lepanto

Thanks for watching!

Colin

Robert Hess 7 Nov 2012
2:59 pm

Steve, the Luxardo cherries out of the jar are neither tart nor bitter, they are delightfully sweet and are perhaps the best cherry for any cocktail that would traditionally use a cherry as a garnish.

...and I feel compelled to also provide some details on the Old Fashioned, since that cocktail is one of my personal specialties. While I realize that many bartenders these days will muddle the “cherry” in the bottom (often along with an orange wedge/wheel), this is in fact not the best way to make this drink.

A proper Old Fashioned is made thusly…

To a rocks glass add a teaspoon of simple syrup and a dash (or two) of Angostura bitters. Half fill the glass with ice, and give it a quick stir. Add 2 ounces of Bourbon (or American Rye), and give it another quick stir. Squeeze a slice of orange peel over the top and drop it in, and garnish with a cherry (a Luxardo Maraschino cherry, pierced on a cocktail pick is highly recommended).

If you are using American Rye here, I might recommend using a slice of lemon peel instead of orange.

You can also use any spirit you might want instead of whiskey. Gin works very well, with which you might want to use orange bitters (and lemon peel). Tequila is also very nice, and here you might want to use agave syrup instead of simple syrup.

-Robert

onkelandy 11 Nov 2012
2:55 am

I love the stories and details in this series.  Spraying Amaretto on top is awesome and the movement of the hands is close to perfection in every single step. Hope therer are more episodes coming ;)

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